Andrew Luck Recovering From Shoulder Surgery

Intro: The lingering shoulder injury that Andrew Luck has played through since 2015 has led to off-season surgery for the franchise quarterback. Luck is recovering from surgery and will be ready for the 2017 season.

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INDIANAPOLIS – After appearing on the injury report every week this past season with a right shoulder ailment, Andrew Luck needed off-season surgery on his throwing shoulder.

On Thursday morning, Jim Irsay took to Twitter to say that Luck is recovering from a "successful" surgery. Irsay said Luck will be ready for the 2017 season.

"Andrew recovering from successful outpatient surgery to fix right shoulder injury that had lingered since 2015. Will be ready for season!" Irsay said on Twitter.

Despite the Colts and Luck believing surgery wasn't going to be necessary, that changed with the season ending back on Jan. 1.

Shoulder problems for Luck began in Week Three of the 2015 season. He initially missed the next two weeks.

A kidney injury in Week Nine of 2015 ended Luck's season.

The shoulder injury did not force Luck to miss any game action in 2016, but it did significantly decrease his practice reps. Luck was on the injury report every week in 2016, scaling back his throwing reps throughout the season. Luck practiced "full" in just half of the team's regular season practices.

The right shoulder wasn't the only thing that plagued Luck this past season. Right elbow, right thumb, a left ankle and a concussion were other issues that limited Luck.

Even with the banged up shoulder, among other things, Luck still finished the season with a career-high in completion percentage (63.5) and yards per attempt (7.8).

Statistically, the 2016 season was the second best of Luck's career. He finished the year 346-of-545 for 4,240 yards, 31 touchdowns and 13 interceptions in playing 15 of 16 games.

Luck enters 2017 having thrown a touchdown in 23 straight games, the longest active streak in the NFL.

The Colts will reconvene as a team in mid-April for OTAs.

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