Andrew Luck Ranked Second-Best Stanford Draft Pick This Century

Intro: NFL.com recently set out to find the best draft picks from the past 17 years from the more prominent programs in college football. At Stanford, Andrew Luck was an obvious standout, but who ranked above him on this particular list?

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INDIANAPOLIS — In 2009, Richard Sherman moved over from wide receiver to the defensive secondary at Stanford, and would combine to pick off six passes in the final two seasons of his collegiate career.

The Seattle Seahawks decided to take a chance on the potential project by selecting Sherman in the fifth round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

As it turned out, Sherman was just getting started. He had four interceptions alone his rookie season, and would pick off eight passes each in 2012 and 2013 as he quickly became one of the top cornerbacks in the league — for the top defensive secondary in the league. He remains one of the more feared members of an opposing team's secondary in the NFL.

Suffice to say, Sherman has certainly proven his value, and then some, since entering the league.

So that might be why it's no surprise that Sherman, and not Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, was ranked as the No. 1 top draft pick from Stanford since 2000 in this recent NFL.com piece.

There is, though, a formula behind College Football 24/7 writer Chase Goodbread's evaluations: players receive points for various honors, including Pro Bowl and All-Pro selections, and the later they were picked in the draft, the more points they stand to be awarded.

Luck, of course, finished second on this particular list, with 8.8, well behind Sherman's 28.5 points. Here's what Goodbread wrote about the Colts' signal caller:

2. Andrew Luck, quarterback
Points: 8.8
Drafted by: Colts, No. 1 overall pick (Round 1), 2012
Skinny: In his first three years, Luck started every game for the Colts, took them to playoffs all three seasons, and made three Pro Bowls. The Luck selection proved to be a much wiser choice than Robert Griffin III, who was taken No. 2 overall by the Washington Redskins in the same draft. It's been a rougher ride for Luck the last two years, due to injuries, but he remains one of the NFL's most gifted passers.

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Luck is certainly the most hyped prospect to come out of Stanford — and perhaps all of college football — since the turn of the century.

A Houston native, Luck started all 38 games he played for the Cardinal, completing 713 of 1,064 passes (67 percent) for 9,430 yards, 82 touchdowns to 22 interceptions; his touchdown passes and pass completion percentage marks were school records. A two-time Heisman Trophy finalist in 2010 and 2011, Luck, the winningest quarterback in Stanford history, earned a boatload of individual accolades, including the Maxwell Award Winner for the National Collegiate Player of the Year, the Walter Camp Football Foundation Player of the Year and the Pac-12 Conference Player of the Year following the 2010 and 2011 seasons. Was also the recipient of the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Trophy and named the Capital One Academic All-America of the Year by CoSIDA in 2011.

In his five seasons with the Colts, he has continued his excellence, completing 1,570 of 2,651 passes for 19,078 yards with 132 touchdowns to 68 interceptions, while also running the ball 286 times for 1,442 yards with another 14 scores.

Luck and Sherman are two of the 63 total picks from Stanford since 2000. Finishing behind them in Goodbread's ranking were guard David DeCastro, center Eric Heitmann and safety Oshiomogho Atogwe.

The analysis from those producing content on Colts.com does not necessarily represent the thoughts of the Indianapolis Colts organization. Any conjecture, analysis or opinions formed by Colts.com content creators is not based on inside knowledge gained from team officials, players or staff.

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