Coaches

Pep Hamilton
Offensive Coordinator
Hometown:
Charlotte, NC
Experience:
9

Pep Hamilton enters his second season with the Indianapolis Colts as the team’s offensive coordinator. Hamilton holds 16 years of combined coaching experience in the NFL and collegiate ranks.

 

In his first season with the Colts, Hamilton led an offense that overcame numerous injuries, as eight offensive players were placed on Injured Reserve, including four starters: tight end Dwayne Allen, running back Vick Ballard, guard Donald Thomas and wide receiver Reggie Wayne. The Colts averaged 341.8 yards of offense per game and the team’s 1,743 total rushing yards were the most for the franchise since the 2006 campaign. Indianapolis set club records for fewest turnovers (14) and fumbles lost (four) and became the first team in the NFL to finish a season with the least amount of turnovers and penalties since the 2002 Kansas City Chiefs.

 

Hamilton was reunited with his quarterback from Stanford, Andrew Luck, who continued his strong level of play from his rookie year, leading the Colts to their second consecutive 11-5 season and their first AFC South Division Championship since 2010. The 22 victories through his first two years are tied for the second-most by a quarterback to start a career since 1970, while his 11 fourth quarter/overtime game-winning drives and 8,196 passing yards both set records for an NFL quarterback through his first two seasons. Luck earned his second straight Pro Bowl appearance and was named AFC Offensive Player of the Week for the second time in his career in Week 7 against Denver.

 

Hamilton guided a group of receivers headlined by Wayne and T.Y. Hilton. Hilton led the Colts with 82 receptions for 1,083 yards and five touchdowns, claiming his first career 1,000-yard season. Wayne recorded 38 catches for 503 yards and two touchdowns for the year before suffering a season-ending injury in Week 7. Following his injury, Hamilton groomed wide receivers LaVon Brazill, Da’Rick Rogers and Griff Whalen who were thrust into more prominent roles on the offense for the remainder of the season.

 

The Colts placed four running backs on Injured Reserve in 2013, including Ballard and Ahmad Bradshaw. After the team acquired Trent Richardson in a midseason trade, he finished the year with 458 rushing yards and three touchdowns to go along with 28 receptions for 265 yards and one touchdown. Donald Brown led the team with 102 rushing attempts for 537 yards and a career-high six touchdowns. His 5.3-yard rushing average was the highest mark for a Colts player since 1961. Brown also posted career highs with 27 receptions for 214 yards and two touchdowns.

 

The Colts offensive line allowed only 32.0 sacks on the year, which ranked sixth in the NFL and fourth in the AFC, despite having to use seven different starting lineups throughout the season. Tackles Anthony Castonzo and Gosder Cherilus were the only linemen to start all 16 games. The team’s third-round draft pick Hugh Thornton was moved into the starting lineup beginning in Week 3 following Thomas’ season-ending injury while Jeff Linkenbach, Xavier Nixon and Joe Reitz also saw starting time due to injuries.

 

Prior to joining the Colts, Hamilton spent three seasons at Stanford University (2010-12), his last two as the team’s offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. He worked closely with current Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, who was a two-time Heisman Trophy finalist, the Pac-12 Conference Player of the Year (2010 and 2011), the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award recipient, the Walter Camp Football Foundation Player of the Year and the Maxwell Award winner as the nation’s top player. Luck threw 82 touchdown passes in 38 career games, breaking John Elway’s career record for touchdown passes. Luck also moved to the top of Stanford’s career list in total offense.

 

In 2012, Hamilton and the Cardinal were the victors of the 99th Annual Rose Bowl as the team compiled a 12-2 record (8-1 Pac-12). Stanford averaged 27.9 points per game and 374.4 net yards per game. Hamilton tutored quarterback Kevin Hogan, who completed 109-of-152 passes for 1,096 yards and nine touchdowns after being inserted as the starter for the remaining five games of the season. He also guided running back Stepfan Taylor, who finished his Stanford career as the team’s all-time leader in career rushing yards (4,212) and tied the school career record in total touchdowns (44).

 

In his first season as Stanford’s offensive coordinator in 2011, the Cardinal scored a school-record 561 points while averaging 43.2 points per game, which ranked seventh in the nation. The offense also set school single-season records for total offense (6,361) and finished eighth in the country in net yards per game (489.3).

 

As Stanford’s wide receivers coach in 2010, Hamilton coached a total of 17 players who caught passes, including 10 who hauled in at least one touchdown from Luck. Stanford’s wide receivers and tight ends combined to catch a school-record 32 touchdowns, while setting the single-season record for scoring (524), scoring average (40.3) and total offense (6,142 yards).

 

Prior to joining Stanford, Hamilton spent seven seasons in the NFL. He served as the quarterbacks coach of the Chicago Bears (2007-09) and was an offensive assistant and quarterbacks coach with the San Francisco 49ers in 2006. Hamilton was with the New York Jets for three seasons holding titles as offensive assistant/quarterbacks coach (2004-05) and offensive quality control coach (2003). He spent one season as the pro personnel intern for the Baltimore Ravens in 2002 before landing his first full-time position with the Jets in 2003. Hamilton also interned with the Washington Redskins (2001) and Kansas City Chiefs (2000).

 

In his final season as the quarterbacks coach for the Bears (2009), Hamilton guided Jay Cutler, who set single-season franchise records for completions (336) and passing attempts (555). In 2008, Kyle Orton compiled the fifth-highest completion percentage in team history (58.5) while finishing sixth in franchise annals in passing yards (2,972).

 

With the 49ers, Hamilton helped groom Alex Smith to become the first quarterback in team history to take every snap from center over an entire campaign (2006). He also worked closely with Jets quarterback Chad Pennington in 2004 as New York started 5-0 prior to Pennington’s injury that forced him to miss the next three games.

 

Hamilton began his coaching career at his alma mater, Howard University, where he served as the Bison’s quarterbacks coach from 1997-2001. He also took on duties as the team’s offensive coordinator for three seasons (1999-2001). A former college quarterback, Hamilton earned Howard’s scholar-athlete award on two consecutive occasions (1995 and 1996) before earning his business degree in 1997.

 

Coaching Career

1997-1998       Howard                                    Quarterbacks

1999-2001       Howard                                    Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks

2000                Kansas City Chiefs                  Summer Coaching Intern

2001                Washington Redskins             Summer Coaching Intern

2002                Baltimore Ravens                    Pro Personnel Intern

2003                New York Jets                         Offensive Quality Control

2004-2005       New York Jets                         Offensive Assistant/Quarterbacks

2006                San Francisco 49ers               Offensive Assistant/Quarterbacks

2007-2009       Chicago Bears            Quarterbacks

2010                Stanford                                  Wide Receivers

2011-2012       Stanford                                  Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks

2013-2014       Indianapolis Colts                    Offensive Coordinator

Pep Hamilton enters his second season with the Indianapolis Colts as the team’s offensive coordinator. Hamilton holds 16 years of combined coaching experience in the NFL and collegiate ranks.

 

In his first season with the Colts, Hamilton led an offense that overcame numerous injuries, as eight offensive players were placed on Injured Reserve, including four starters: tight end Dwayne Allen, running back Vick Ballard, guard Donald Thomas and wide receiver Reggie Wayne. The Colts averaged 341.8 yards of offense per game and the team’s 1,743 total rushing yards were the most for the franchise since the 2006 campaign. Indianapolis set club records for fewest turnovers (14) and fumbles lost (four) and became the first team in the NFL to finish a season with the least amount of turnovers and penalties since the 2002 Kansas City Chiefs.

 

Hamilton was reunited with his quarterback from Stanford, Andrew Luck, who continued his strong level of play from his rookie year, leading the Colts to their second consecutive 11-5 season and their first AFC South Division Championship since 2010. The 22 victories through his first two years are tied for the second-most by a quarterback to start a career since 1970, while his 11 fourth quarter/overtime game-winning drives and 8,196 passing yards both set records for an NFL quarterback through his first two seasons. Luck earned his second straight Pro Bowl appearance and was named AFC Offensive Player of the Week for the second time in his career in Week 7 against Denver.

 

Hamilton guided a group of receivers headlined by Wayne and T.Y. Hilton. Hilton led the Colts with 82 receptions for 1,083 yards and five touchdowns, claiming his first career 1,000-yard season. Wayne recorded 38 catches for 503 yards and two touchdowns for the year before suffering a season-ending injury in Week 7. Following his injury, Hamilton groomed wide receivers LaVon Brazill, Da’Rick Rogers and Griff Whalen who were thrust into more prominent roles on the offense for the remainder of the season.

 

The Colts placed four running backs on Injured Reserve in 2013, including Ballard and Ahmad Bradshaw. After the team acquired Trent Richardson in a midseason trade, he finished the year with 458 rushing yards and three touchdowns to go along with 28 receptions for 265 yards and one touchdown. Donald Brown led the team with 102 rushing attempts for 537 yards and a career-high six touchdowns. His 5.3-yard rushing average was the highest mark for a Colts player since 1961. Brown also posted career highs with 27 receptions for 214 yards and two touchdowns.

 

The Colts offensive line allowed only 32.0 sacks on the year, which ranked sixth in the NFL and fourth in the AFC, despite having to use seven different starting lineups throughout the season. Tackles Anthony Castonzo and Gosder Cherilus were the only linemen to start all 16 games. The team’s third-round draft pick Hugh Thornton was moved into the starting lineup beginning in Week 3 following Thomas’ season-ending injury while Jeff Linkenbach, Xavier Nixon and Joe Reitz also saw starting time due to injuries.

 

Prior to joining the Colts, Hamilton spent three seasons at Stanford University (2010-12), his last two as the team’s offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. He worked closely with current Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, who was a two-time Heisman Trophy finalist, the Pac-12 Conference Player of the Year (2010 and 2011), the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award recipient, the Walter Camp Football Foundation Player of the Year and the Maxwell Award winner as the nation’s top player. Luck threw 82 touchdown passes in 38 career games, breaking John Elway’s career record for touchdown passes. Luck also moved to the top of Stanford’s career list in total offense.

 

In 2012, Hamilton and the Cardinal were the victors of the 99th Annual Rose Bowl as the team compiled a 12-2 record (8-1 Pac-12). Stanford averaged 27.9 points per game and 374.4 net yards per game. Hamilton tutored quarterback Kevin Hogan, who completed 109-of-152 passes for 1,096 yards and nine touchdowns after being inserted as the starter for the remaining five games of the season. He also guided running back Stepfan Taylor, who finished his Stanford career as the team’s all-time leader in career rushing yards (4,212) and tied the school career record in total touchdowns (44).

 

In his first season as Stanford’s offensive coordinator in 2011, the Cardinal scored a school-record 561 points while averaging 43.2 points per game, which ranked seventh in the nation. The offense also set school single-season records for total offense (6,361) and finished eighth in the country in net yards per game (489.3).

 

As Stanford’s wide receivers coach in 2010, Hamilton coached a total of 17 players who caught passes, including 10 who hauled in at least one touchdown from Luck. Stanford’s wide receivers and tight ends combined to catch a school-record 32 touchdowns, while setting the single-season record for scoring (524), scoring average (40.3) and total offense (6,142 yards).

 

Prior to joining Stanford, Hamilton spent seven seasons in the NFL. He served as the quarterbacks coach of the Chicago Bears (2007-09) and was an offensive assistant and quarterbacks coach with the San Francisco 49ers in 2006. Hamilton was with the New York Jets for three seasons holding titles as offensive assistant/quarterbacks coach (2004-05) and offensive quality control coach (2003). He spent one season as the pro personnel intern for the Baltimore Ravens in 2002 before landing his first full-time position with the Jets in 2003. Hamilton also interned with the Washington Redskins (2001) and Kansas City Chiefs (2000).

 

In his final season as the quarterbacks coach for the Bears (2009), Hamilton guided Jay Cutler, who set single-season franchise records for completions (336) and passing attempts (555). In 2008, Kyle Orton compiled the fifth-highest completion percentage in team history (58.5) while finishing sixth in franchise annals in passing yards (2,972).

 

With the 49ers, Hamilton helped groom Alex Smith to become the first quarterback in team history to take every snap from center over an entire campaign (2006). He also worked closely with Jets quarterback Chad Pennington in 2004 as New York started 5-0 prior to Pennington’s injury that forced him to miss the next three games.

 

Hamilton began his coaching career at his alma mater, Howard University, where he served as the Bison’s quarterbacks coach from 1997-2001. He also took on duties as the team’s offensive coordinator for three seasons (1999-2001). A former college quarterback, Hamilton earned Howard’s scholar-athlete award on two consecutive occasions (1995 and 1996) before earning his business degree in 1997.

 

Coaching Career

1997-1998       Howard                                    Quarterbacks

1999-2001       Howard                                    Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks

2000                Kansas City Chiefs                  Summer Coaching Intern

2001                Washington Redskins             Summer Coaching Intern

2002                Baltimore Ravens                    Pro Personnel Intern

2003                New York Jets                         Offensive Quality Control

2004-2005       New York Jets                         Offensive Assistant/Quarterbacks

2006                San Francisco 49ers               Offensive Assistant/Quarterbacks

2007-2009       Chicago Bears            Quarterbacks

2010                Stanford                                  Wide Receivers

2011-2012       Stanford                                  Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks

2013-2014       Indianapolis Colts                    Offensive Coordinator

 

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